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Afghanistan: Save the Children, 6 mesi dopo il passaggio di potere, i “bambini sono sull’orlo del precipizio”. Questo è il tema di una serie di scatti del famoso fotografo Jim Huylebroek, che ha girato il Paese per evidenziare la tragedia umana che si sta consumando

Arzoo*, 12, is the oldest of eight children in her family. Because schools have been closed she hasn’t been to school all winter. Her father hasn’t been able to work for months and the family has been borrowing money from other families to buy food.
Most days they just eat bread because they cannot afford anything else. Arzoo’s mother, father and youngest brother, 18-month-old Aga Khan*, are ill, but the family can’t afford to go to the doctor and said they wouldn’t go unless it was life threatening.
Several children in the family attend Community Based Education (CBE) classes established by Save the Children. These classes have been set up in communities where school age students don’t have access to education, because either there are no schools available or they are too far away.
Arzoo* said, “Now there is no job for my father to do and bring food home. One day we have food and the next day we don’t.”
Her mother, Ferisha*, 35, said: “There is absolutely no work. People are desperate for food; there is nothing.”
When asked about the future for her children she said: “My hope is that they study and make progress; one can only have this hope.”

L’Organizzazione, che sta distribuendo denaro contante, vestiti invernali e carburante alle famiglie in alcune delle zone più colpite, ha lanciato una petizione per chiedere al Fondo Monetario Internazionale e alla Banca Mondiale di sbloccare i finanziamenti vitali per il Paese: www.savethechildren.it/firmaperlafghanistan

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Delagha* 50, his father, wife and children live in Kabul. He used to work in the brick factories on the outskirts of the city, but recently it has become hard to find work. The family has run out of money and is unable to buy food. Delagha*’s 18-month-old daughter Kamelah*, has been very ill, and his elderly father, Mohammad*, is suffering from pneumonia and has lost his sight.
 
One of his children Irfanullah* has finished school and is now trying to find work to support his family. His three older brothers have already left the country to look for work in Pakistan. Irfanullah* is worried he won’t be able to find work.
 
Save the Children is working with the family to provide Community Based Education (CBE) classes. These classes have been set up in communities where school age students don’t have access to education, because either there are no schools available or they are too far away.
Delagha said : “We do not have any other work, these little ones are in your school, my daughter and these little ones.”
“At the moment no body is working, two (boys) have gone to Pakistan and will work if they find any.”
“The situation has got difficult. Our family compromises of sixteen people and one bag of flour lasts us eight days.”
“The other day I went to the shop and previously one bag of flour was 1400 –1500 Afghan Afghani but now it is 2500”
“As a family we use threeto four bags per month. For this reason, I also said to my son to look and find some kind of work. He said to me that if I found him work that he would do it”
“I cannot afford to get separate heaters for my daughters and sons. This is only one heater, and we all surround it.”
“Our income has changed a lot, we used to have some money for essential needs, now we do not even have that.”

Dai bambini che vivono sotto un telone in uno scantinato alle comunità del deserto che scavano pozzi e raccolgono l’acqua piovana. Una serie di fotografie per Save the Children, l’Organizzazione che da oltre 100 anni lotta per salvare le bambine e i bambini a rischio e garantire loro un futuro, del fotografo di fama mondiale Jim Huylebroek evidenzia la tragedia umana che si sta svolgendo in Afghanistan a sei mesi dal drammatico passaggio di potere.

3-year-old Samira* and her grandfather. Samira was previously given treatment for malnutrition and pneumonia by Save the Children, and has fully recovered.
Gulalai*, 25, (not pictured) and her husband Mohammad* have six children aged between 1 day and 6 years old. They live in a tiny two-room house made of compacted earth in a remote desert community in Jawzjan, northern Afghanistan. They don’t have electricity or running water. Mohammad is unable to find work most of the time and, without any income, the family survive on just bread alone most days.
Gulalai had just given birth to one-day-old Malika* when we met her. She had to give birth at home, without a midwife, because the family could not afford the 500/600 Afghanis (US$5) it costs to travel to the nearest hospital. She has since fallen ill, but is unable to afford medicines. She worries about how she will feed her new-born daughter, because she is so undernourished she is not producing enough milk to feed both Malika and her one-year-old son, Ninangyali*, who is suffering from severe acute malnutrition.
When Ninangyali was eight-months-old, the family fled their home to escape conflict and were living in a camp in the desert. Without enough food to eat, he soon became thin and weak from malnutrition. The family took him to hospital but were unable to afford the treatment he needed. Fortunately, Ninangyali was able to get treatment at Save the Children’s mobile health clinic. The doctor there told us that his condition was so bad when she first saw him that he almost certainly would have died if Save the Children hadn’t treated him. He now visits the clinic once a week, and his condition is slowly improving. His three-year-old sister, Samira*, was previously treated for malnutrition and pneumonia by Save the Children, and has fully recovered.
The community where the family lives have little access to healthcare. Few can afford to travel to the nearest hospital, and even if they make it there they us

Il fotografo ha viaggiato con Save the Children attraverso il Paese – dalle pianure del nord devastate dalla siccità alle gelide strade di Kabul – catturando le storie di bambini le cui vite sono state devastate dalla crisi umanitaria per la serie intitolata “Children on the edge of life”.

Le immagini raccontano le storie della loro lotta per la sopravvivenza. Famiglie che prendono decisioni impossibili su quale figlio possono permettersi di sfamare e quale soffrirà la fame; bambini che muoiono mentre si stanno recando alle cure mediche; madri che partoriscono da sole su pavimenti sterrati perché non possono permettersi di andare in ospedale; e piccoli costretti a lavorare per strada per mettere il cibo in tavola.

(Left to right): Gululai* (Jamila), Ninangyali* (Nik Mohammad), Sharifa* (Fatima) at home.
Gulalai*, 25, and her husband Mohammad* have six children (aged between 1 day and 6 years old) and live in a tiny two-room house made of compacted earth in a remote desert community in Jawzjan, northern Afghanistan. The family don’t have electricity or running water. When we met Gulalai, she had just given birth to one-day-old Malika*. She gave birth at home, without a midwife, because they could not afford the 500/600 Afghanis (US$5). It costs to travel to the nearest hospital. She has since fallen ill, but is unable to afford medicines.

Gulalai’s one-year-old son, Ninangyali* has severe malnutrition, and is being treated by Save the Children’s mobile health team. He visits the clinic once a week for treatment, and his condition is slowly improving. His three-year-old sister, Samira*, was previously treated for malnutrition and pneumonia by Save the Children, and has fully recovered. Now, Gulalai is worried that her new-born daughter will fall ill as well, because they don’t have any food to give her.

Gulalai’s husband is unable to find work most days, and without any income, the family cannot afford enough food, and survive on just bread.

The community where the family lives have little access to healthcare. Few can afford to travel to the nearest hospital, and even if they make it there they usually can’t afford to pay for the medicines they are prescribe. They rely on Save the Children’s mobile health clinic – which visits the area once a week – for essential medical advice and treatment.
Gulalai*, 25, said : “My baby was born yesterday at 10 o’clock. He was born at home, we could not afford to get to the hospital, one Zarange (taxi) charges 500 or 600 (US $5). We do not have that much money to pay and go to hospital for the baby to be born there.
“I have this illness that when I stand, my body hurts, so I am unable to stand as

Nel nord dell’Afghanistan, Laalah* 12 anni, vive con sua madre e altri quattro fratelli in una tenda, costruita con teli cerati nel seminterrato di un edificio in costruzione. Suo padre, Maalek*, 40 anni, fatica a trovare lavoro come manovale e a volte non ha altra scelta che mandare i suoi figli a cercare spazzatura da vendere o bruciare per riscaldare la loro casa.

Maalek ha detto: “Ogni volta che i bambini sono liberi dalla scuola, escono e raccolgono i rifiuti. Vanno per le strade, raccolgono e vendono lattine in modo da potersi permettere le spese scolastiche o il cibo. Il mio sogno è trovare un posto per costruire una casa per loro in cui vivere, in modo da non essere più senzatetto”.

Gulalai*, 25, (not pictured) and her husband Mohammad* have six children aged between 1 day and 6 years old. They live in a tiny two-room house made of compacted earth in a remote desert community in Jawzjan, northern Afghanistan. They don’t have electricity or running water. Mohammad is unable to find work most of the time and, without any income, the family survive on just bread alone most days.
Gulalai had just given birth to one-day-old Malika* when we met her. She had to give birth at home, without a midwife, because the family could not afford the 500/600 Afghanis (US$5) it costs to travel to the nearest hospital. She has since fallen ill, but is unable to afford medicines. She worries about how she will feed her new-born daughter, because she is so undernourished she is not producing enough milk to feed both Malika and her one-year-old son, Ninangyali*, who is suffering from severe acute malnutrition.
When Ninangyali was eight-months-old, the family fled their home to escape conflict and were living in a camp in the desert. Without enough food to eat, he soon became thin and weak from malnutrition. The family took him to hospital but were unable to afford the treatment he needed. Fortunately, Ninangyali was able to get treatment at Save the Children’s mobile health clinic. The doctor there told us that his condition was so bad when she first saw him that he almost certainly would have died if Save the Children hadn’t treated him. He now visits the clinic once a week, and his condition is slowly improving. His three-year-old sister, Samira*, was previously treated for malnutrition and pneumonia by Save the Children, and has fully recovered.
The community where the family lives have little access to healthcare. Few can afford to travel to the nearest hospital, and even if they make it there they usually can’t afford to pay for the treatment they need. Families here rely on Save the Children’s mobile health clinic – which visits the area once a we

Laalah ha detto: “Spero che ci siano scuole in futuro. Voglio andare a scuola. Diventare un’insegnante o un medico. Voglio che la nostra vita sia buona, per mangiare del buon cibo”.

Quasi cinque milioni di bambini sono sull’orlo della fame mentre il Paese affronta la peggiore crisi alimentare di sempre. Il triplo impatto di siccità, conflitti e collasso economico ha spinto molte famiglie in territori pericolosi, costrette a vendere quel poco che hanno per comprare da mangiare, mandando i figli a lavorare o cavandosela solo con il pane.

Laalah* 12, sits with her siblings Faakhir*, 1, Aabhas*, 10, Aabid* 7, Cachi*, 5, outside their home in Balkh province.
They were afraid they would lose their lives and their house was destroyed after they left.  
Their father Maalek* tries to find work as a day labourer but rarely does. Unable to afford anywhere to live, he has erected a tent in the basement of a half-finished building.
The siblings are forced to collect rubbish and twigs to burn, and cans and other bottles to sell in the bazaar for tiny amounts of money.  
On the day Save the Children visited it had been three days since the children had eaten anything apart from bread. 
 “There’s no food. Sometimes we eat once a day. Sometimes twice. If we receive help from neighbours, sometimes three times. ” says their father Maalek*.
Save the Children provided the family with a winter kit of a blanket, children’s clothes and fuel.
To help families who have lost their homes or their income to get through the winter months, Save the Children are distributing winter supplies – including warm clothing and shoes for adults and children, blankets, household items and hygiene products. We’re also providing families with cash so they can buy food, fuel, and any other essentials they may need. Cash transfers allow families to rebuild their lives with dignity and helps them to avoid resorting to negative coping mechanisms like cutting back on meals, selling their assets or pulling children out of school to work.
Save the children plans to support over 35,000 families, including 150,000 children this winter with winter kits and cash transfers.
The aid agency is also delivering primary, newborn, and maternal health services, including treatment for malnutrition, through mobile health clinics; trucking water to communities cut off from safe water supplies; and helping children to keep learning through Community-Based Education classes.
In 2021, Save the Children supported over 1.4 mill

Il ritiro degli aiuti e il congelamento delle attività finanziarie hanno portato i servizi pubblici dell’Afghanistan sull’orlo del collasso. Gli ospedali in tutto il Paese sono stati costretti a chiudere poiché non ci sono più salari per gli operatori sanitari. I bambini gravemente malati vengono respinti perché semplicemente non ci sono medicine per curarli e, dove sono disponibili, l’aumento dei prezzi fa sì che siano troppo costosi per poterseli permettere.

A Kabul, la dodicenne Arzoo*, la più grande di sette figli, non è andata a lezione per tutto l’inverno perché le scuole sono chiuse. Suo padre non può lavorare da mesi, quasi tutti i giorni mangiano solo pane perché non possono comprare nient’altro. La madre, il padre e il fratello di 18 mesi sono malati, ma la famiglia non può permettersi di andare dal medico.  “Ora mio padre non ha più nessun lavoro che gli consenta di portare cibo a casa. Abbiamo da mangiare un giorno sì e uno no”, ha detto Arzoo.

Sua madre, Ferisha*, 36 anni, ha commentato: “Non c’è assolutamente lavoro. Le persone sono alla disperata ricerca di cibo; non c’è niente”. E alla domanda sul futuro dei suoi figli ha detto: “Mi auguro che studino e facciano progressi; si può solo avere questa speranza”.

“Ognuna di queste storie è un potente promemoria della triste realtà che vivono le famiglie in tutto il Paese, della lotta quotidiana per sopravvivere all’inverno e dei milioni di giovani vite che sono a rischio. Il tempo stringe per i bambini afghani, per ottenere il sostegno urgente di cui hanno così disperatamente bisogno. Le famiglie stanno facendo tutto il possibile, prendendo decisioni impossibili su chi mangia e chi no. Gli aiuti umanitari possono aiutare i bambini a superare l’inverno, ma questa crisi non può essere risolta solo con gli aiuti. L’Afghanistan ha un’economia basata sulla circolazione di denaro, quindi senza l’ingresso di soldi nel Paese, non è difficile capire che la gente comune soffrirà. I governi devono trovare un modo per sbloccare i fondi vitali e le risorse finanziarie per prevenire ulteriori perdite di massa di vite umane” ha dichiarato Chris Nyamandi, direttore di Save the Children in Afghanistan.

Save the Children sta distribuendo denaro contante, vestiti invernali e carburante alle famiglie in alcune delle zone più colpite per aiutarle a stare al caldo, a nutrirsi e ad affrontare i rigori della stagione. L’assistenza in denaro aiuta a impedire alle famiglie di ricorrere a misure disperate che incidono negativamente sui bambini come il lavoro minorile, i matrimoni precoci e la riduzione dei pasti.

Nel 2021 le cliniche sanitarie mobili di Save the Children in Afghanistan hanno condotto quasi 375.000 controlli e curato più di 12.000 bambini per malnutrizione. Per far fronte a questa drammatica situazione, Save the Children ha lanciato una petizione per chiedere al Fondo Monetario Internazionale e alla Banca Mondiale di sbloccare i finanziamenti vitali per il Paese. Si può accedere e firmare la petizione per assicurare ai bambini afghani l’aiuto umanitario di cui hanno urgente bisogno alla pagina: www.savethechildren.it/firmaperlafghanistan

 

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